Chus Martinez On Coffee Enemas

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A coffee enema is the enema-related procedure of inserting coffee into the anus to cleanse the rectum and large intestines.

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This procedure, although well documented, is considered by most medical authorities to be unproven, rash and potentially dangerous.

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It is, nonetheless, great fun!

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Although the notion of rectal cleansing goes back to the Ancient Egyptians, the idea of caffeine as a useful enema substance is relatively new.

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In 1920, German scientists investigated caffeine’s effect on the bile duct and small intestines. Max Gerson proposed that coffee enemas had a positive effect on the gastro-intestinal tract.

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Gerson said that coffee enemas had positive effects on patients with tuberculosis, and later even those with cancer.

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He claimed that unlike saline enemas, the caffeine travelled through the smooth muscle of the small intestine, and into the liver.

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This, he said, cleared even more of the gastro-intestinal tract and removed more toxins and bile than a normal enema.

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He told his patients often that the “coffee enemas are not given for the function of the intestines but for the stimulation of the liver.”

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Some proponents of alternative medicine have claimed that coffee enemas have an anti-cancer effect by “detoxifying” metabolic products of tumours.

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There is no medical scientific evidence to support any anti-cancer effect of coffee enemas.

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Coffee enemas can cause numerous side effects, including infections, sepsis (including campylobacter sepsis), severe electrolyte imbalance, colitis, polymicrobial enteric septicemia, proctocolitis, salmonella, brain abscess, and heart failure.

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If the coffee is inserted too quickly or is too hot, it could cause internal burning or rectal perforation.

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Long term use of coffee enemas can lead to malabsorption of fat, fat-soluble vitamins, and calcium.

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The use of coffee enemas has led to several deaths as a result of severe electrolyte imbalance, hyponatremia, dehydration, pleural and pericardial effusions.

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has ruled that study participants must be warned of the risk of death from coffee enemas in studies that use them.

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However the use of the coffee enema in sexual practices is now conclusively known to be utterly orgasmic for those attracted to anal activities and excitements, and the risks involved simply add to the thrill!

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Some sexual fetishists have even suggested that enemas performed with weasel coffee – that is the seeds of coffee berries once they have been eaten and shat out by the Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) – might be a fun way of preparing patients for fecal transplants.

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Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), also known as a stool transplant, is the process of transplantation of fecal bacteria from a healthy individual into a recipient with bowel problems; it is a highly effective treatment for patients suffering from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), which produces effects ranging from diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis.


Chus Martinez On The John

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A toilet is a sanitation fixture used primarily for the disposal of human excrement and urine, often found in a small room referred to as a toilet/bathroom/lavatory. Flush toilets, which are common in many parts of the world, may be connected to a nearby septic tank or more commonly in urban areas via “large” (3–6 inches, 7.6–15 cm) sewer pipe connected to a sewerage pipe system. The water and waste from many different sources is piped in large pipes to a more distant sewage treatment plant. Chemical toilets are used in mobile and many temporary situations where there is no access to sewerage, dry toilets, including pit toilets and composting toilet require no or little water with excreta being removed manually or composted in situ.

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The word toilet may also be used, especially in British English to describe the room containing the fixture, for which euphemisms such as restroom or bathroom are used in American English. Prior to the introduction of modern flush toilets, most human waste disposal was done through the use of household chamber pots, or took place outdoors in outhouses or latrines. Pail closets were introduced in England and France in an attempt to reduce sewage problems in rapidly expanding cities.

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Ancient civilisations used toilets attached to simple flowing water sewage systems included those of the Indus Valley Civilization, e.g., Harappa[ and Mohenjo-daro which are located in present day India and Pakistan and also the Romans and Egyptians. Although a precursor to the modern flush toilet system was designed in 1596 by John Harington, such systems did not come into widespread use until the late nineteenth century. Thomas Crapper was one of the early maker of toilets in England.

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Diseases, including cholera – which still affects some 3 million people each year, -can be largely prevented when effective sanitation and water treatment prevents faecal matter from contaminating waterways, groundwater and drinking water supplies. Infected water supplies can be treated to make the water safe for consumption and use. There have been five main cholera outbreaks and pandemics since 1825, during one of which 10,000 people died in 1849 in London alone. The physician John Snow proved that deaths were being caused by people drinking water from a source that had been contaminated by a nearby cesspit that was used by people who were infected with cholera. The London sewer system of the time had not reached crowded Soho and many houses had cellars (basements) with overflowing cesspools underneath their floorboards.

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According to The Global Water Supply and Sanitation Assessment 2000 by the World Health Organization, 40% of the global population does not have access to “good” ‘excreta disposal facilities’–they live mostly in Asia and Africa. There are efforts being made to design simple effective squat toilets for these people. Usually, they are made by digging a hole, then installing a premade plastic squat toilet seat atop this hole, covering the walls with canvas.

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First Manifesto of the International Bowel Movement by Chus Martinez

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Coprophilia (from Greek κόπρος, kópros—excrement and φιλία, filía—liking, fondness), also called scatophilia or scat (Greek: σκατά, skatá-shit), is the paraphilia involving sexual pleasure from faeces. In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-IV-TR), it is classified under 302.9 Paraphilia Not Otherwise Specified and has no diagnostic criteria other than a general statement about paraphilias that says “the diagnosis is made if the behaviour, sexual urges, or fantasies cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning”. Furthermore, the DSM-IV-TR notes, “Fantasies, behaviours, or objects are paraphilic only when they lead to clinically significant distress or impairment (e.g. are obligatory, result in sexual dysfunction, require participation of non-consenting individuals, lead to legal complications, interfere with social relationships)”.

Although not all coprophiles would necessarily be sadomasochists, little data on the prevalence of this behaviour is available except from studies of the sadomasochism (SM) community. A study of 164 male sadomasochists from Finland from two sadomasochism clubs found that 18.2% had engaged in coprophilia; 3% as a sadist, 6.1% as a masochist, and 9.1% as both. 18% of heterosexuals and 17% of homosexuals in the study pool had tried coprophilia, showing no statistically significant difference between heterosexuals and homosexuals. In a separate article analyzing 12 men who engaged in bestiality, an additional analysis of an 11-man subgroup revealed that 6 had engaged in coprophilic behaviour, compared with only 1 in the matched control group consisting of 12 SM-oriented males who did not engage in bestiality.