Chus Martinez On Klismaphilia

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Klismaphilia (sometimes spelled Klysmaphilia) describes those who are sexually aroused by the introduction of liquids into the rectum and colon via the anus. It is a paraphilia that often involves the use of enemas. Dr. Joanne Denko , an early investigator of the fetish, coined the term klismaphilia in 1973 to describe the activities of some of her patients.

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Klismaphiliacs can gain satisfaction through enema fantasies, by actually receiving one, or through the process of eliminating steps to receiving one.

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Klismaphilia is practiced by both men and women. However, as with most paraphilias, men are more likely to be klismaphiliacs. They may also gain pleasure from a large, water distended belly or the feeling of internal pressure.

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Often, klismaphiliacs report discovering these desires after a chance administration of an enema sometime in their childhood, but others report discovering these feelings later on.

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Klismaphilia is practiced both heterosexually and homosexually. The paraphilia may be used as a substitute or as an auxiliary by its practitioners for genital sexual activity.

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Usually, klismaphiliacs engage in their deviant behaviour secretly. Klismaphiliacs may also try to get others to administer enemas under the pretense of being constipated. If this is the case they will probably try to conceal the pleasure they receive from these administrations.

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Klismaphilics are rarely ‘treated’ for their condition, since most have no desire to be “cured”. Health treatment for klismaphilia is typically only focused on ensuring the techniques employed and chemicals used are not harmful to the practitioner. In certain cases cramps produced by the chemicals used in enemas have led to hospitalisations, in some instances the effects can even be life-threatening.

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Chus Martinez On Orgasmic Meditation

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Orgasmic meditation or OMing is a term coined by Nicole Daedone to signify a mindfulness practice in which the object of meditation is finger to genital contact. OMing is practiced in pairs, with one practitioner stroking the genitals of the other, and both focusing their attention on the sensation with the stated goal of developing connective resonance between them. Although the practitioners can be of either sex, the focus of orgasmic meditation seems to be on the female orgasm through subtle and deliberate stimulation of the clitoris. Both partners, however, can share in the sensation and fulfillment via a kind of “pleasure by proxy.” Proponents state that orgasmic meditation encompasses more than just orgasm and that it encourages greater emotional awareness, connected relationships, and sense of fulfillment. Others describe the sensation as “a heady buzz, mixed with equal parts wooziness and intensity of focus.”

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In press accounts, orgasmic meditation has been compared to tantric practices. The idea, similar to Buddhist Tantric sex, is to extend the sensory peak. Daedone has stated in interviews that OMing also borrows from other traditions including yoga, and other forms of meditation, and she describes it as a central element of what she terms the “Slow Sex Movement”. She claims that OMing brings consciousness to sexuality in the same way that sitting meditation brings consciousness to stillness and yoga brings consciousness to movement. Proponents maintain that the practice leads to more intense and profound orgasms, expands one’s capacity to feel pleasure and other sensations, and promotes greater personal awareness and interpersonal connectivity. Others describe more limited effects, such as simply “getting in touch with one’s body.” Some who have participated in or witnessed the practice report feeling a sense of discomfort or inappropriateness. “I tried with great futility to make the connection between an austere Zen monastery filled with silent monks meditating on emptiness, and what I had just seen.”

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The practice of orgasmic meditation is done with a partner. One person lies down, unclothed from the waist down, while her partner sits alongside. The one sitting uses his or her index finger to slowly, deliberately stroke the clitoris and genitals of the other. Typically this safe sex practice involves the wearing of gloves. The session lasts for 15 minutes and is timed precisely. Both partners focus their attention on the point of contact or stroke, simply feeling the sensation that is present. If the mind drifts, attention is brought back to the point of contact and immediate sensations. Practitioners of orgasmic meditation maintain that the practice nourishes the limbic system, the part of the brain shared with other mammals and associated with emotion, empathy, and motivation. When the OMing session is over, both partners share their experiences verbally.

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OMing requires a partner, and so is distinct from masturbation, for two reasons. First, the voluntary mind must be given a rest, surrendering to the experience rather than seeking to produce the desired sensations. Secondly, the resonance between two partners is essential to the experience of shared sensation. OM is usually practiced separately from sex and often in a location other than the bedroom; as distinct from foreplay, Daedone describes it as a practice “designed to keep a woman on a plateau of sensation.” A visiting UK columnist surmised that “OM is a form of recalibration that prepares the body for better, more intense sex.”

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In The Four Hour Body, a New York Times Best Seller described as “a lab report on more than a decade of diet, exercise, and sexual trials that Tim Ferriss carried out on himself,” two chapters are devoted to “The 15 Minute Female Orgasm” in which Ferriss describes his quest to learn to facilitate the experience of orgasm in any woman. After describing his introduction to the practice in a OneTaste coaching session, Ferriss concludes that “this should be required education for every man on the planet.” However, he finds that the position prescribed for orgasmic meditation can cause tiring in the lower back, so he develops his own alternative “elbow-brace position” which he diagrams in his book, along with the anatomy of the clitoris and mechanics of stroking. He ascribes the success of the method to the fact that it is presented as a goalless practice and that it decouples orgasm from sex. Jack Canfield, co-editor for the Chicken Soup for the Soul series, also states that he and his wife had great success with orgasmic meditation.

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Chus Martinez On Orgasm Control

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Orgasm control, also known as “edging”, “peaking”, “surfing”, and by other terms, is a sexual technique that involves the maintenance of a high level of sexual arousal for an extended period of time without reaching orgasm, although a climax may be reached eventually. If orgasm is not reached after the extended period of arousal, it is referred to as erotic sexual denial. If the partner whose orgasm is being controlled, sometimes referred to as the submissive partner, is put into physical restraints, it may better control the orgasm (the activity is sometimes called tie and tease and if orgasm is denied it is tease and denial). Another possibility is for one partner to help produce multiple orgasms in the other.

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Orgasm control can involve either one-sex partner being in control of the other partner’s orgasm, or someone delaying their own orgasm during either sexual intercourse or masturbation. To experience orgasm control, any method of sexual stimulation can be used – for example, manual, oral, intercourse, or with sex toys – either alone or by means of one or more active partners. Orgasm control is sometimes called “slow masturbation” or “extended massive orgasm”. It is similar to the Venus Butterfly technique described by Leah and Bob Schwartz in The One Hour Orgasm (1988).

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In a two-person sexual activity, one partner would stimulate the other, gradually bringing them up to the point high in the plateau phase where an orgasm is actually building, and will then reduce the level of stimulation to just below that needed to trigger release. By carefully varying the intensity and speed of stimulation, and by practising with the same partner to learn their responses, a person can be held in the highly aroused state near orgasm for extended periods of time. This process may be repeated as desired, but at some point repetition may cause the urge to orgasm to become overwhelming. Once enough stimulation to achieve an orgasm is provided, the release is often stronger than usual.

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Since orgasm control prolongs the experience of powerful sexual sensations occurring during the final build-up to orgasm, the physical demands of being kept or keeping oneself in this highly excited state for an extended time can induce a pleasurable, almost euphoric state, and at times creates changes within an individual’s consciousness.

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Orgasm control requires a degree of skill. It also requires enough familiarity with either a partner or one’s own responses to be able to vary the intensity and the timing of the stimulation accurately. If there is too little stimulation, or if it is reduced too soon, the experience is not as intense as it could have been. If there is too much stimulation, a person may pass the point of no return and orgasm occurs too soon.

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Long term intimacy between orgasm control partners helps each to understand the level of erotic intensity required by their partner. The technique is an acquired skill that is developed through practice. Performing orgasm control with the same partner(s) for extended periods of time generally leads to greater success at the practice. The technique requires all partners to be aware of the others’ limits’. Likewise, in order to control your own orgasm, you need a good knowledge of your own body and how it reacts to different levels of sexual stimulation. Orgasm control is as much about knowing your own body as it is about the sexual skills of your partner(s).

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Since solo masturbation allows for precise control over sexual stimulation, many people practice orgasm control by themselves. Masturbation is an easy way to learn one’s sexual limits. Wanking practiced with the aim of orgasm control should be carried out with the intention of making every stroke feel exquisite and not to relieve tension, in the way “simple” masturbation does. This can be done through a gradual stimulation of the genitals , followed by making connections between the primary area (penis or clitoris) and secondary areas (lips, nipples or other erogenous body parts). A proper connection between genitals and other areas has been established when they are stimulated with the same moves and to the same intensity.

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Chus Martinez On The Zombie Pin-Up

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In recent years zombies have become distinctly more like their living counterparts—subjects rather than corpses—to the point where zombies are frequently more akin to “average people who are experiencing mental anguish” than mindless animated flesh. However, even where zombies demonstrate self-awareness, their zombiedom means they are still perceived as “others” by their living counterparts. Zombie fiction’s living characters stubbornly overlook the possibility of zombie autonomy despite evidence to the contrary, simply because zombies are zombies.

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This power is converted into pleasure. It is hard to imagine the victimizer viewing such victims as objects. The violator may only seek to justify the violation by focusing on: (a) the victim’s inability to protest; (b) their perception that any protest matters far less than their own pleasure; their pleasure in specifically defiling the victim (taking pleasure from the protest); or the knowledge that no repercussions will result from their action (the victim does not ‘matter’ in a social sense, or lacks rights, putting zombies in a similar category to those labelled ‘mentally ill’).

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Indeed, despite the corpse’s inability to remonstrate against its defilement, necrophilia is founded on “sexual pleasure [derived] from inflicting physical or mental pain on others” (namely the living relatives of the deceased). Even necrophilia therefore hinges on the violator’s powered infliction of suffering.

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The zombie symbolizes ‘monstrous otherness’. Zombies are bodies, nothing more, having “no race, no gender, no sexuality,” zombies have been increasingly positioned in gendered roles. The recent rise in zombie porn— including Porn of the Dead (2006) and Dawna of the Dead (2010)—further attests to the contemporary zombie’s gendering. Zombiedom is such an apt metaphor for female oppression. When gendered female, the undead fittingly symbolize this discursive history of femininity under patriarchy.

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Chus Martinez On Dominance And Submission

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Dominance and submission (also called D&s, Ds, and D/s) is a set of behaviours, customs and rituals involving the giving by one individual to another individual of control over them in an erotic episode or as a lifestyle.

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Physical contact is not a necessity, and it can even be conducted anonymously over the telephone, email or other messaging systems. In other cases, it can be intensely physical, sometimes traversing into sadomasochism. In D/s, both parties take pleasure or erotic enjoyment from either dominating or being dominated. Those who take the superior position are called dominants, doms (male) or dommes (female), while those who take the subordinate position are called submissives or subs (male or female). A switch is an individual who plays in either role. Two switches together may negotiate and exchange roles several times in a session. “Dominatrix” is a term usually reserved for a female professional dominant who dominates others for pay.

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Dominance and submission, and the inner conflict and surrender connected with these are enduring themes in human culture and civilization. In human sexuality this has broadened to include mutual exploration of roles, emotions and activities that would be difficult or impossible to do without a willing partner taking an opposing role.

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A 1985 study suggests that only about 30% of participants in BDSM activities are females. A 1995 study indicates that 89% of heterosexual females who are active in BDSM expressed a preference for a submissive-recipient role in sexual bondage, suggesting also a preference for a dominant male, and 71% of heterosexual males preferred a dominant-initiator role.

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A safe word is usually given to the submissive partner to prevent the dominant from overstepping physical and emotional boundaries. The safe word is especially important when engaging in verbal humiliation or playing ‘mind-games’ because the submissive may not be aware of an emotional boundary until it is crossed. If an emotional boundary is breached and the safe word called, the dominant should cease all play immediately and discuss the emotional breach with the submissive in a tender and understanding manner. Negotiating limits in advance is also an important element in a D/s relationship.

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It is important to note that for a safe, sane and consensual environment to be maintained, all participants should have a safe word of which the other is aware; this includes the dominant partner. While it may not seem so from the outside, Dominants will also have limits and boundaries of their own, and should not only have a safe word, but be comfortable calling it if their own limits are exceeded. This includes cases where the dominant may feel things have gone too far, and are uncomfortable continuing. As with a safe word call from any other, it should herald the stopping all play and a recuperative discussion between the participants.

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There can be any number of partners in a D/s relationship, in some cases with one dominant sometimes having several submissives, who may in turn dominate others, or a submissive sometimes may have multiple dominants. Relationships may be monogamous or polyamorous. Romantic love is not necessarily a feature in D/s, partners might be very much in love or have no romantic relationship at all.

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Variation in D/s is virtually limitless and the activities take many forms. These may include: domestic servitude or consensual slavery, enforced chastity of the submissive, erotic humiliation, sexual slavery, verbal humiliation, fetishes, such as shoe/boot worship, dehumanisation (pony or animal play) or objectification (forniphilia, becoming an ‘inanimate object’ such as a foot stool), cross-dressing, whipping, corporal punishment, trampling, human toilet – golden showers, feminization, cuckold, bondage (sexual), public humiliation.

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These may be combined with other forms of BDSM. A classic example of D/s is the sissymaid, where an adult male dresses in cartoonish female clothing and performs stereotypical female chores such as housecleaning or serving tea. It should be noted that cross-dressing in D/s does not always involve a desire to be sissified or made into caricatures of women or to serve; for example, others may desire to be made as beautiful as possible and interact on a “girlfriend-to-girlfriend” non-sexual basis. Consent is a vital element in all psychological play, and consent can be granted in many ways.

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Some people maintain a special room or area, called a dungeon, which contains special equipment (shackles, handcuffs, whips, queening stools and spanking benches or a Berkley horse, for example) used for play scenes, or they may visit a BDSM club that maintains such facilities.

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Many submissives wear a “collar” to denote their status and commitment. It can be much like a wedding band, except that only the submissive partner wears one. The traditional collar is a neck band in leather or metal, chosen, designed or even crafted by the dominant partner. Some subs wear a “symbolic collar”, often a bracelet or ankle chain, which is more subdued than the traditional collar and can pass in non-BDSM situations. It is not uncommon for a sub to have several collars for special occasions. Dog collars are integral for K9 role-playing—pup-play.

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Chus Martinez On Tickling Fetishes

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Tickling games are interpersonal or social activities involving the tickling of one person by another. Many people find tickling to be a pleasurable experience in its own right, but also an erotic experience. Some people are sexually excited by being tickled or by tickling another person. Some people engage in tickling games as part of a social activity, or as part of a couple bonding process or as foreplay.

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Knismolagnia is the experience of “arousal from tickling”. Acarophilia, often confused with knismolagnia, refers to arousal from scratching. Excessive tickling has been described as a primary sexual obsession and, under these circumstances, is sometimes considered a paraphilia. People whose sexuality is based almost solely on tickling can be said to have a tickling fixation. This fixation may also exist outside of sexual contexts.

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Tickling is a form of physical intimacy involving a highly sensual touching of the body of one person by another. Tickling also serves as a bonding experience between friends, and is an indication of familiarity and trust. Between adolescents, tickling often serves as an outlet for sexual energy, with erotic games, foreplay and sex being the motivation of the tickler.

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It is classified by psychologists as part of the fifth and highest grade of social play that involves special intimacy or “cognitive interaction”. This suggests that tickling works best when all the parties involved feel comfortable with the situation and one another.

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Some people find the tickling of virtually any part of their body to be pleasurable, and some people are sexually excited watching others being tickled. It can play a part in courting rituals, especially among younger people, and can form part of foreplay for many partners in the term’s broadest sense. Popular tickle spots include the feet, navel, armpits, breasts, nipples, ribs, sides, stomach, and genitals. The body openings and erogenous zones are extremely ticklish; however, the tickling of these areas is generally not associated with laughter or withdrawal.

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Those with a tickling fetish are likely to enjoy this activity to the exclusion of other pre-sex activities. For some, the focus is entirely on the tickling, with full intercourse less important or not included at all. Tickling is mostly associated with the bare feet or armpits. Examples of tickle models are Lindsay Leigh and Jade Valentine.

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Some people take part in tickling games or contests that test their endurance to being tickled, for amusement, for erotic pleasure, or for other reasons. These games may involve some form of physical restraint of the person to be tickled to prevent them protecting the ticklish spots or otherwise interfering with the game. Common positions for tickling are the over-arm tie, the hogtie, spread-eagle, with the person being tied up, cuffed or in stocks. The restraints may be left loose to increase the amount of possible movement, but short of the person being able to protect the ticklish spots. On the other hand, some participants prefer very tight bondage. The tied person may also be blindfolded to increase the anxiety and surprise element.

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The objective of such games is to generate uncontrollable writhing, struggling, laughing and vocalizations etc., from the person being tickled, while the person tries to control such reactions, without the ability to physically defend the ticklish spots. In dominance and submission scenarios, sexual partners may agree upon a safeword to signal that tickling should stop.

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Chus Martinez On Pro-Sex Feminism

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There have been two strains of feminist thought on the subject of human sexuality. One tendency has criticized the restrictions on women’s sexual behaviour. This tradition of feminist sexual thought has called for a sexual liberation that would work for women as well as for men. The second tendency has considered sexual liberalisation to be a mere extension of male privilege. This latter tradition forms a part of conservative, anti-sexual discourse.

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Sex-positive feminism, also known as pro-sex feminism, sex-radical feminism, or sexually liberal feminism is a movement that began in the early 1980s. It champions the idea that sexual freedom is an essential component of women’s freedom. Some became involved in the sex-positive feminist movement in response to efforts by anti-pornography feminists, such as Catharine MacKinnon, Andrea Dworkin, Robin Morgan and Dorchen Leidholdt, to put pornography at the centre of a feminist explanation of women’s oppression. This period of intense debate and acrimony between sex-positive and anti-pornography feminists during the early 1980s is often referred to as the “Feminist Sex Wars”. Authors who have advocated sex-positive feminism include Ellen Willis, Kathy Acker, Susie Bright, Patrick Califia, Gayle Rubin, Carol Queen, Shar Rednour, Annie Sprinkle, Avedon Carol, Tristan Taormino, Rachel Kramer Bussel, Nina Hartley and Betty Dodson.

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Sex-positive feminists oppose legal or social efforts to control sexual activities between consenting adults, whether these efforts are initiated by the government, other feminists, opponents of feminism, or any other institution. They embrace sexual minority groups, endorsing the value of coalition-building with members of groups targeted by sex-negativity.

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The cause of sex-positive feminism brings together anti-censorship activists, LGBT activists, feminist scholars, sex radicals, producers of pornography and erotica, among others (though not all members of these groups are necessarily both feminists and sex-positive people). Sex-positive feminists reject the vilification of male sexuality that they attribute to many radical feminists, and instead embrace a broad range of human sexuality. They argue that the patriarchy limits sexual expression and are in favour of giving people of all genders more sexual opportunities, rather than restricting pornography Sex-positive feminists generally reject sexual essentialism: the idea that sex is a natural force that exists prior to social life and shapes institutions. Rather, they see sexual orientation and gender as social constructs that are heavily influenced by society.

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Sex-radical feminists in part come to a sex-positive stance because they distrust patriarchy’s ability to secure women’s best interest through laws limiting consensual sexual expression Indeed feminists identify women’s sexual liberation as the real motive behind the women’s movement. Naomi Wolf claims: “Orgasm is the body’s natural call to feminist politics.” Sharon Presley asserts that in the area of sexuality government blatantly discriminates against women.

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The rise of second-wave feminism, which began in the 1960s, was concurrent with the sexual revolution and legal rulings that loosened restrictions on access to pornography. In the 1970s radical feminists became increasingly focused on issues around sexuality in a patriarchal society. Some feminist groups began to concern themselves with prescribing proper feminist sexuality. This included both lesbian separatist groups, and some heterosexual women’s groups such as Redstockings. On the other hand there were also feminists, such as Betty Dodson, who saw women’s sexual pleasure and masturbation as central to women’s liberation. Pornography, however, was not a major issue; right-wing feminists were generally opposed to pornography, but the issue was not treated as especially important until the mid-1970s. There were, however, feminist prostitutes-rights advocates, such as COYOTE, which campaigned for the decriminalization of prostitution.

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From the onset of the oil crisis in 1974, there was a political backlash against the percieved liberalism of the sixties, and which ultimately took the form of Thatcherism in the United Kingdom and Reaganism in the United States. This conservative turn was embraced by parts of the feminist movement, with some activists claiming that pornography underpinned patriarchy and was a direct cause of violence against women. Robin Morgan summarized this idea with the slogan: “Pornography is the theory; rape the practice.”

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Andrea Dworkin and Robin Morgan began articulating a vehemently anti-porn feminist ideology from the mid-seventies, and anti-porn feminist groups, such as Women Against Pornography became increasingly active during the late-1970s. As anti-porn feminists broadened their criticism and activism to include not only pornography, but prostitution and sadomasochism, other feminists became concerned about the direction the movement was taking and grew more critical of anti-porn feminism. This included feminist BDSM practitioners, prostitutes-rights advocates, and many liberal and anti-authoritarian feminists for whom free speech, sexual freedom, and advocacy of women’s agency were central concerns.

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One of the earliest feminist arguments against this turn in the movement was Ellen Willis’s essay “Feminism, Moralism, and Pornography” first published in October 1979 in the Village Voice. In response to the formation of Women Against Pornography in 1979, Willis expressed worries about anti-pornography feminists’ attempts to make feminism into a single-issue movement, and argued that feminists should not issue a blanket condemnation against all pornography and that restrictions on pornography could just as easily be applied to speech that feminists found favourable to themselves.

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Around the same time Gayle Rubin began encouraging feminists to consider the political aspects of sexuality without promoting sexual repression. She also argued that the blame for women’s oppression should be put on targets who deserve it: “the family, religion, education, child-rearing practices, the media, the state, psychiatry, job discrimination, and unequal pay…” rather than on relatively uninfluential sexual minorities.

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Gayle Rubin also argued that anti-pornography feminists exaggerated the dangers of pornography by showing the most shocking pornographic images (such as those associated with sadomasochism) out of context, and in a way that implied the women depicted were actually being raped, rather than emphasizing that these scenes depict fantasies and use actors who have consented to being shown in such a way.

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Sex-positive feminists argue that access to pornography is as important to women as to men, and that there is nothing inherently degrading to women about pornography. Likewise, sex-positive feminists believe that accepting the validity of all sexual orientations is necessary in order to allow women full sexual freedom.

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Rather than distancing themselves from homosexuality and bisexuality because they fear it will hurt mainstream acceptance of feminism, sex-positive feminists believe that women’s liberation cannot be achieved without also promoting acceptance of homosexuality and bisexuality.

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Many transgender people see gender identity as an innate part of a person. Some feminists criticize this belief, arguing instead that gender roles are societal constructs, and are not related to any natural factor. Sex-positive feminists support the right of all individuals to determine their own gender, and promote gender fluidity as one means for achieving gender equality.

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