Chus Martinez On Nudism In Crimea

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Crimea has long tradition of nudism and communudism. It was the first place where Russians (repressed first by the Tzars and more recently by Joseph Stalin and Vladimir Putin) were able to gather together to enjoy a nudist lifestyle and social naturism. In the early 20th century, shortly after the German naturist movement emerged, the Ukrainian born Russian language symbolist poet, painter and freemason, Maximilian Voloshin established a nudist colony at his home in Koktebel.

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Max Voloshin was inspired to pursue public nudism by the activities of a German organisation called the Freier Bund. Voloshin begins his essay On Nudism, first printed in Dnevniki pisatelej 1 (March 1914, pages 34-­40), with a sketch of that organisation:

The Freier Bund is the name of a German society whose goal is the physical and moral improvement of humanity through nudity. The society is located in Berlin. It has its own park at Grünwald, where members of both sexes gather for games in the open air. The Society was founded by Dr. Küster, a physician who was able to assert the Society’s right to exist before the most bashful of all police forces, the Prussian police.

Dr. Küster says, “There are two reasons keeping people from nudity: the fear of catching cold and bashfulness. The first reason does not stand up medically to criticism, because our skin is an astonishing regulatory mechanism, thanks to which we, once we are in motion, do not have to attend to any atmospheric changes whatsoever. As for bashfulness, if your sensibilities are annoyed by semi-­nudity, take my nudity cure and you will see how your nerves will be soothed and what a profound sense of physical and moral liberation will remain with you after visiting our park.”

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Voloshin concludes On Nudism with the following:

Compared to the Russians, the French are almost free of a sense of shame about their own bodies. But they are always struck by the Russians’ freedom to bare themselves spiritually. In all spheres of spiritual life they are insurmountably bashful and reserved. (Thus, for example, insanity in a French family is carefully concealed.) The Russians’ openness about themselves attracts the French and disturbs them, as does the innocent shamelessness of children and savages, as does a freedom that is inaccessible to them. The spiritual shamelessness of the Russians can only be explained by the absence of external forms of psychic life. The Russian spirit feels itself only from within, and does not yet know its own epidermis. And in this area all bashfulness is concentrated in the covering of the skin.

We experience an acute sense of confusion and awkwardness when we accidentally see undressed a woman well known by us and respected by everyone. This is natural.

Once in the theatre I happened to meet a woman whom I know well but had never seen dressed. (She was a model.) At first I felt exactly the same feeling of awkwardness and embarrassment.

Going bathing, I undress at home, put on a bathing robe, cross the thirty metres separating my home from the sea, and throw myself into the water. The local inhabitants are profoundly shocked by this behaviour.

Local decency insists that each individual undress in full view of others, on the open beach ten steps from the road.

In my memory remains a model who did not dress during her breaks but sat in the corner of the studio and laid out her needlework. In this pose there was as much beauty and modesty as when she appeared clothed in a long morning dress. The eye refused to recognize her nakedness.

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In 1913, when a Russian Orthodox zealot named Abram Balashov used a knife to stab Ilya Repin’s realist painting Ivan The Terrible Killing His Son, Voloshin was the only native Russian speaking intellectual to defend the man, indicating that it was an aesthetic statement appropriate to the painting, which displayed gore and bad taste. Like Repin’s pictorial realism, Balashov’s political views were reactionary: while stabbing the painting three times Balashov shouted: “Enough blood! Down with blood!” Balashov was incarcerated in a mental hospital and the average Russian intellectual of the time appeared more shocked by his attempt to destroy a famous painting than the repressive nature of the Russian state.

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Max Voloshin’s house in Koktebel attracted the most open-minded people of its time: artists and their models and mistresses. It was a place where male painters would strip off to work in the buff with their nude models on the seashore, shocking the locals with their “impermissible behaviour”.

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Immediately after the October Revolution in Russia, nudism was tolerated by some Bolshevik leaders including Lenin, who claimed he thought “it has a healthy proletarian source”. Although the Bolsheviks merely replaced the formal with the real domination of capital in Russian, to establish their grip on the country they had to pretend to be more radical and further to the left than they actually were, hence their early toleration of communudism. Once Stalinist glaciation set in and the Bolsheviks came to believe they had an iron grip on Russia, the radical pro-nudist Soviet organization “Shame Off!” was disbanded in 1925, and nudism was repressed.

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Following on from the thawing of Stalinist glaciation and tankie repressiveness came the emergence of a Soviet hippie movement in the late-1960s and early-1970s. At this time, echoes of the international sexual revolution began to be felt in both Russian and Crimea (as well as throughout the Ukraine and in other Soviet Republics and eastern bloc satellite states). Soviet hippies hit upon the remote location of Lisya Buhta (Fox Bay in English), near Koktebel in Crimea, for their nude encounters and communudist social experiments. Fox Bay not only had a beautiful beach, it was a suitable location for camping, since there is small forest nearby where firewood can be collected and drinking water is available at the foot of the Echki-Dag mountain.

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Feeling Fox Bay was becoming too popular, some communudists decided to find a wilder place to camp about and get nekkid. They chose Meganom, a headland near Sudak with many small bays and pebble beaches. Since it’s difficult to get to Meganom, and there are no shops or houses, this location was considered a paradise for communudists who wanted to contemplate each other’s bodies and engage in outdoor communal sex in complete tranquillity.

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There’s another communudist beach close to Sevastopol called Fiolent. The water is very clean and is a pale greyish green in colour. While it is easy to get to Fiolent from Sevastopol, the communudist beach itself is hard to access due to landslides. Communudists reach it by jumping across rocks. There’s only a few places flat enough to pitch a tent at Fiolent. The Southern coast of Crimea has fewer nudist beaches than the area around the regional capital of Sevastopol. However there is one communudist hang out in Simeiz, beneath Koshka Mountain. Nudists trek to Simeiz to enjoy the spectacular landscapes and to take photos of each other posing buck naked with huge rocks and thickets of juniper all around them.

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The long tradition of nudism and communudism in Crimea is currently threatened by the invasion of the peninsula by Russian soldiers directed by ultra-reactionary Vladimir Putin. Nudists and communudists from around the world must protest against the threat to their activities posed by Putin’s plans to annex Crimea. Proletarian nudity could become a crime in Crimea if Putin takes control of the peninsula…

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Chus Martinez On Coitus Reservatus

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Coitus reservatus – also known as sexual continence – is commonly thought of as a form of sexual intercourse in which the penetrative partner does not attempt to ejaculate within the receptive partner, but instead attempts to remain at the plateau phase of intercourse for as long as possible avoiding the seminal emission. Another term used for this kind of shagging is the word karezza.

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The word karezza is sometimes said to be derived from the Italian word “carezza” meaning “caress”. However, Alan W. Watts believed, in error, that it was a Persian word. The concept of karezza is loosely akin to maithuna in Hindu tantra and sahaja in yoga. Control of ejaculation is also a key aspect of Taoist sexual practices (known as “cai Yin pu Yang” and “cai Yang pu Yin”).

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Karezza signifies to express affection in both words and action, and while it fittingly denotes the union that is the outcome of deepest human affection, it is used technically to designate a controlled sexual union. In practice it is more than just self-control, it is mutual control where the penetrative partner helps the receptive partner and vice versa. The technique also prolongs sexual pleasure to the point of achieving mystical ecstasy. In this practice, orgasm is separated from ejaculation, making possible enjoyment of the pleasure of sexual intercourse without experiencing seminal ejaculation, while still enjoying orgasm.

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Some groovers also apply the principles of karezza to masturbation, whereby a person attempts to delay orgasm as long as possible to prolong pleasure in a process known as “orgasmic brinkmanship”, “surfing”, or “edging” but this is different from the heterosexual practice of “karezza”. One purpose of karezza is the maintenance, and indeed, intensification of desire and enjoyment of sexual pleasure within the context of relationships. In this practice a woman can and does enjoy a prolonged orgasm while a man demonstrates self-control; similarly, in the context of two male sexual partners, the receptive partner can enjoy the stimulation of his prostate for a longer period of time than he would otherwise.

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Chus Martinez On Autofellatio

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Autofellatio – also known as yogafellatio – is the act of orally stimulating one’s own penis. It is physically possible for men who have sufficient flexibility, penis size or a combination of the two to suck themselves off.

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Egyptologist David Lorton claims that many ancient texts refer to autofellatio within the religion of Egypt, both in the realm of the gods and among the followers performing religious rituals. According to Lorton, in the Papyrus Bremner-Rhind 28, 20–24, in a document called “Book of Overthrowing Apophis”, there is a poem narrating how the sun god Ra had created the god Shu and goddess Tefnut by fellating himself and spitting his own semen onto the ground. In ancient Egyptian texts this act is usually performed by the god Atum.

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Few men possess sufficient flexibility and penis length to safely execute the necessary front bend to perform autofellatio. The yoga position known as Plough is usually recommended as the easiest and safest way for men to autofellate themselves. The increased flexibility achieved via gravity-assisted positions such as Plough, and physical training such as gymnastics, contortion, or yoga, make autofellatio possible for many men.

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American biologists Craig Bartle and Alfred Charles Kinsey reported that fewer than 1% of males can successfully make oral contact with their own penis, and that only 2 or 3 men in a thousand could perform a full autofellatio. With the increasing popularity of yoga around the world, the percentage of men able to autofellate is steadily increasing.

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While relatively few pornographic films involve autofellatio, some pornographic actors are noted for this skill including Ron Jeremy for his 1970s examples on film. Other actors including Scott O’Hara, Cole Youngblood, Steve Holmes, and Ricky Martinez have also been featured performing autofellatio and the practice has become a pornographic masturbation subgenre.

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In the 26th season (2000–2001) of the popular Saturday Night Live comedy show Will Ferrell plays a character who joins a yoga class with the sole purpose to be able to fellate himself as a part of reaching Samadhi. In the skit the character is shown to have been successful after three years of efforts. It is estimated that about 40 percent of men who take up yoga do so in the hope that it will enable them to autofellate.

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Chus Martinez On Agalmatophilia

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Agalmatophilia (from the Greek agalma ‘statue’, and -philia love) is a paraphilia involving sexual attraction to a statue, doll, mannequin or other similar figurative object.

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The attraction may include a desire for actual sexual contact with the object, a fantasy of having sexual (or non-sexual) encounters with an animate or inanimate instance of the preferred object, the act of watching encounters between such objects, or sexual pleasure gained from thoughts of being transformed or transforming another into the preferred object.

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Agalmatophilia may also encompass Pygmalionism (from the myth of Pygmalion), which denotes love for an object of one’s own creation. Some Pygmalionism enthusiasts – known as bread doll fanciers – like to construct dolls from bakery products that once made are used for sexual purposes.

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Agalmatophilia became a subject of clinical study with the publication of Richard von Krafft-Ebing’s Psychopathia Sexualis. Krafft-Ebing recorded an 1877 case of a gardener falling in love with a statue of the Venus de Milo and being discovered attempting to fuck it.

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An important fantasy for some individuals is being transformed into the preferred object (such as a statue) and experiencing an associated state of immobility or paralysis. Such fantasies may be extended to role-playing, and the self-coined term used by fetishists who enjoy being transformed into what appears to be a “rubber doll” or “latex doll”.

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Sexualised life-size dolls have extensively featured in the work of famous art photographers such as Hans Bellmer, Bernard Faucon, Helmut Newton, Morton Bartlett, Katan Amano, Kishin Shinoyama, and Ryoichi Yoshida.

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Agalmatophilia features prominently in Luis Buñuel’s L’Âge d’Or (the female protagonist sucks a statue’s toe) and in Tarsem Singh’s 2000 thriller movie The Cell. The movie centres on a serial killer named Carl Stargher (played by Vincent D’Onofrio) who drowns his victims (all young women) and then bleaches their bodies so they resemble dolls. He then masturbates while hanging himself above them.

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Chus Martinez On John Fare Considered As A Sexy Amputee!

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John Fare is a fictional performance artist who in a short story published in 1968 is described as having used robotic surgery to remove parts of his body onstage. By 1972 his final performance was declared to have been suicide by beheading. The original source is a short story entitled “The Hand” by N.B. Shein (possibly a pseudonym), published in Insect Trust Gazette 3 in 1968. It is a piece of cracked humour done in the style of the underground writer and mail artist Blaster Al Ackerman. Shein’s story is presented as a review of a piece of live art but it is so crazed that it is difficult to read it as anything other than a figment of some drug loon’s imagination:

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“While the audience, seated on folding chairs surrounding a cleared space in the centre of the room, watched silently, Fare and his two assistants (Andoff and Golni Czervath) brought in skeletons of metal, tubing, wires and heavy anonymous boxes and assembled the equipment, piece by piece, in the cleared space in the midst of the audience. Their movements, graceful and sure, and the subtle lighting effects created a weird atmosphere in the small gallery, added to — not destroyed — by the fact that the lights were operated in full view of the audience. It requires a good sense of dramatic timing to bring this sort of thing off and Fare succeeded, employing all the cliches of science-fiction (the mad scientist touch) and creating the performance right in front of the audience.”

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Tim Craig published an embellished version of the piece in Studio International (November 1972, page 60). This was in reply to a letter to the editor inquiring about an artist named Fahey who ended his career by having his head amputated onstage. Craig clearly doesn’t take the original piece at all seriously. He edits it, partially rewrites it, and – assuming he isn’t the original author using a different name –  passes it off as his own. His additions include observations such as:

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“I was reminded for a moment of a xylophone recital I and a girl named Nellie had gone to about ten years earlier on the planet Neptune. Her last name was something like Fisher, only it wasn’t Fisher.”

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The point of Craig’s additions seems to be to underscore the fictional nature of the piece. Making the whole exercise look even more like a prank is the appended editors note: “The letter below, and the attached comment by Tim Craig were held over from earlier this year from motives of distaste, and for checking.” Ha ha ha!

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Insect Trust Gazette and Studio International provide us with the following biographical outline of our fictional phantom: John Charles Fare was born in 1936 in Toronto and attended Forest Hill College. In 1959 he moved to London to study at the Bartlett School of Architecture, but soon left to live in Copenhagen.

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Fare was briefly held in a mental health facility for exposing himself in public at performances. After his release, he was re-arrested for gluing objects to a car. The car’s owner, musician and inventor Golni Czervath, did not press charges and befriended Fare. The two developed a robotic amputation machine with the painter Gilbert Andoff. The first performance was a lobotomy on Fare in June 1964. All performances took place on a Friday.

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By the time Fare performed at the Isaacs Gallery in Toronto on 17 September 1968, he “was short one thumb, two fingers, eight toes, one eye, both testicles, and several random patches of skin.” The amputated parts were preserved in alcohol. That evening, he had his right hand amputated. Fare’s body was fitted with small microphones, which transmitted his pulse and breathing frequency in a distorted fashion. Craig states Fare appeared in six further shows between 1968 and 1972.

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In 1985 Danny Devos wrote to Isaacs Gallery founder Avrom Isaacs enquiring about John Fare and his supposed performance in 1968. The response included a statement in writing that the story of John Fare “has no factual basis,” adding “there was no such person as John Fare as far as I know.”

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The story was reprinted in The Coil Handbook edited by John Sanders and Mick Gaffney (London 1986). This included further correspondence with Isaacs, who said, “I know of no such person as John Fare. In the sixties I had a series of mixed media concerts in my gallery, and out of this came the myth of John Fare. Every five years or so, someone rediscovers the myth and writes me a letter such as yours.”

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Note on the twin original print sources for this urban legend: The Insect Trust Gazette ran for only three issues from 1964 to 1968. Leonard Belasco, Jed Irwin, Robert Basara, and Bill Levy edited the magazine in Philadelphia and later California. The magazine took its name from a line in a William Burroughs novel. Burroughs contributed work to the first two issues. The magazine grew from the literary scene surrounding Temple University in Philadelphia.

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Aside from pieces by Burroughs, the first issue of Insect Trust Gazette included various other chance compositions: a computer-generated prose poem, a Brion Gysin permutation, as well as selections from Jackson Mac Low. The magazine also featured some famous artistic ancestors of the post-war avant-garde and the cut-up: surrealists in the shape of Hans Arp, Antonin Artaud, Paul Klee, Max Ernst and Paul Eluard.

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Insect Trust Gazette 3 featuring the John Fare short story leaned more towards concrete poetry. This, the final issue, is full of visual prose and poetry. Unlike the first issue which is small and perfect bound, the third is larger in size and spiral bound. Typography and graphic patterns take centre stage. Individual pieces experiment with a number of different fonts and font sizes as well as punctuation.

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The best known of the Insect Trust Gazette editors is William (Bill) Levy. He was born on January 10, 1939 and left the United States in 1966. He edited or founded other magazines such as Suck and The International Times, as well as the European editions of High Times and Penthouse. Among other titles, Levy is the author of The Virgin Sperm Dancer, Wet Dreams, Certain Radio Speeches of Ezra Pound and Natural Jewboy.

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Studio International is a British publication that began life as The Studio: An Illustrated Magazine of Fine and Applied Art, the first number appeared in April 1893. It championed and influenced art nouveau and the arts and crafts movements. After the First World War, The Studio attempted to maintain its circulation by covering impressionism, futurism and cubism. In the second half of the twentieth-century, the magazine was redesigned and re-launched as Studio International. Peter Townsend became its editor in the 1960s, with Charles Harrison as the assistant editor. Richard Cork, replaced Townsend as editor in the mid-1970s, after the magazine had run the John Fare piece.

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Chus Martinez On Suspension Bondage

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Suspension bondage is a form of sexual bondage where a bound person is hung from one or more overhead suspension points. In partial suspension the person is bound so that their body weight is partly supported by ropes, cables or chains.

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The classic partial suspension position is to have the person balancing on one foot with part of their weight supported through a chest harness and the other leg pulled up in some direction. A person lying on their upper back with legs tied upwards to a suspension point to pull their lower back off the ground would also qualify as partial suspension.

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In full suspension the person is completely supported by suspension ropes, cables or chains, and they have no contact with the ground. The position of the person’s body in a full suspension is only limited by their endurance and the skill of the binder.

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The main effect of suspension bondage is to create a heightened sense of vulnerability and inescapability, as the subject is made to feel that by attempting to free themselves they may fall and hurt themselves, thus also creating a form of mental bondage in addition to the physical one that holds them. Being suspended, especially in a large open space, also creates a sense of objectification, submissiveness and erotic helplessness for the subject, which can be erotically stimulating for them and for those observing them. Rope suspension is sometimes done as performance art at BDSM conventions and fetish-themed nightclubs.

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Suspension can alternatively create a sense of liberation in that one can “fly” around the room, and some styles of rigging are optimal for the suspendee to have control over their spin rate, body position, and general activities. Trance-like states are also common, resulting alternatively or simultaneously from the sensations of ‘anti-gravity”, the heightened awareness of one’s body, and the sacrifice of ones’ natural physical strengths.

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The three main suspension positions are vertical, horizontal and inverted. Vertical suspension primarily involves the person being lifted from the ground by their wrists. This is usually achieved by use of rope or by special suspension cuffs. When using rope, extreme damage can be caused to the soft tissues of the wrists, as well as reducing circulation, so being suspended by ropes can only normally be achieved for a very short period of time. Wrist suspension generally stretches out the body highlighting the ribs and pelvis. Often in fiction and movies a person may be pictured hanging from metal cuffs or handcuffs. This is possible, although extremely painful and will leave deep marks in the wrists. The safest and “most comfortable” method of suspension by the wrists is to use suspension cuffs as they are specifically designed to spread the weight around the wrist as much as possible.

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An alternative method of vertical suspension is to use a bondage rope harness. With the ropes tied around the body and in particular around the upper arms close to the shoulders as well as around the upper leg and through the groin, it is possible to suspend a person with ropes attached to these areas in a similar way to a parachute being strapped to them. In this position the arms and legs may be left to hang free, as the person would have great difficulty getting free without assistance.

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Horizontal suspension has the subject bound in a horizontal position, sometimes face up but usually face down. The body is lifted into this position either by attaching bondage equipment to the wrists and ankles, or to other areas of the body, or a mixture of both, with the subject’s weight born by these areas. The ankles or wrists may be brought together or kept apart by a spreader bar. In case of the wrists and ankles ropes or suspension cuffs can be used. When the body itself is used to suspend the person, they may first be tied into a conventional bondage position such as a hogtie or ball tie, then by attaching ropes or chains to ropes under areas of the body able to take weight the person is lifted into the air.

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A variation on this position is to secure the wrists to either the spreader bar or to a securing point between their ankles forming a hogtie, resulting in what is called a suspension bow. In this position, if the subject is a female and facing down, her breasts would be pointing almost straight down depending on the strictness of the position, and nipple clamps and weights can be added for painful stimulation. The clamps may alternatively be secured to a point on the floor, limiting the subject’s ability to struggle or move at all without causing pain.

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Inverted suspension is the most difficult type of all. Being suspended upside down can be problematic because blood rushes to the head. Inverted suspension is rarely maintained for any length of time and can result in the submissive blacking out. To be suspended in this position, ropes or suspension cuffs are used to lift the person into the air by their ankles.

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Unlike when a person is suspended by their wrists, rope suspension around the ankles can be maintained for much longer as the ankle region naturally is able to take far more weight and stress than the wrists. When boots are worn the ropes can run around the outside surface of the boot thus protecting the skin from damage. The person may be suspended with their legs together, or held apart either by using a spreader bar or by securing the ankles to two separate locations. With the legs held in this position, the subject may have an increased sense of vulnerability as their genital region would be easily accessible.

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The danger most often associated with suspension bondage, over and above the usual risks inherent in bondage, is falling; whether due to a weak suspension point, faulty equipment or poor technique. Inverted positions are especially hazardous in this regard since a head-first fall of only a few inches can kill or paralyze a person. Less obvious dangers include nerve compression and resulting damage, circulation problems and fainting, and the recently-recognized harness hang syndrome. Harness hang syndrome appears to relate to suspension with the legs below the heart, as in the case when someone is suspended in a standing position, with no weight on their legs. Extracting a person safely out of suspension bondage can be difficult if they are unconscious, or if a winch or hoist jams. Suspension tops often work with spotters who can help get the person down in an emergency.

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Chus Martinez On Nude Karate

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Nude karate (also known as pink karate) is a style of karate done in the buff. It was developed from various martial arts by Gichin Funakoshi (1868–1957) and his son Gigo (Yoshitaka) Funakoshi (1906–1945). Gichin was born in Okinawa and is widely credited with popularizing “nude karate” through a series of public demonstrations, and by promoting the development of nude karate clubs at universities, including those at Keio, Waseda, Hitotsubashi (Shodai), Takushoku, Chuo, Gakushuin, and Hosei.

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Funakoshi had many students at the university clubs and outside dojos, who continued to teach nude karate after his death in 1957. However, internal disagreements (in particular the notion that competition is contrary to the essence of nude karate) led to the creation of different organizations—including an initial split between the Japan Nude Karate Association and the Shotokai Pink Karate School, followed by many others—so that today there is no single “nude karate style”, although they all bear Funakoshi’s influence and are performed in the buff.

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Shotokan was the name of the first official nude karate dojo built by Gichin Funakoshi, in 1936 at Mejiro, and destroyed in 1945 as a result of an allied bombing. Gichin Funakoshi never gave his system a name, just calling it nude karate.

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Nude karate training is usually divided into three parts: kihon (basics), kata (forms or patterns of moves), and kumite (sparring). Techniques in kihon and kata are characterized by deep, long stances that provide stability, enable powerful movements, and strengthen the legs.

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Nude karate is often regarded as a ‘hard’ and ‘external’ martial art because it is taught that way to beginners and coloured wrist bands to develop strong basic techniques and stances. Initially strength and power are demonstrated instead of slower, more flowing motions. Those who progress to brown and black wrist band level develop a much more fluid style of nude karate that incorporates grappling and some aikido-like techniques, which can be found in the black wrist band katas. Kumite techniques mirror these stances and movements at a basic level, but are less structured, with a focus instead on speed and efficiency.

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Funakoshi wrote: “The ultimate aim of nude karate lies not in victory or defeat, but in the perfection of the character of the participant.” The naked warrior is always a humble anti-capitalist warrior!  Nude karate is also a form of communudism!

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Chus Martinez On Muscle Worship

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Muscle worship is a social behaviour, usually with a sexual aspect (a form of body worship), in which a participant, the worshiper, touches the muscles of another participant, the dominator, in sexually arousing ways, which can include rubbing, massaging, kissing, licking, “lift and carry”, and various wrestling holds.

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The dominator is almost always either a bodybuilder, a fitness competitor, or wrestler—an individual with a large body size and a high degree of visible muscle mass. The worshiper is often, but not always, skinnier, smaller, and more out of shape.  Muscle worship can include participants of both sexes and all sexual orientations.

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The amount of forceful domination and pain used in muscle worship varies widely, depending on the desires of the participants. Sometimes, the dominator uses his or her size and strength to pin a smaller worshiper, forcing the worshiper to praise the dominator’s muscles, while in other cases, the worshiper simply feels and compliments the muscles of a flexing dominator.

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Male and female bodybuilders offer muscle worship sessions for a price in order to supplement their low or nonexistent income from bodybuilding competitions. Paid sessions sometimes involve sexual gratification, even when well-known competitors are involved, they offer fans the chance to meet in person and touch a highly muscular man or woman.

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Muscle Worship is a widespread practice amongst gay men since they sometimes view bodybuilders as sexual objects, and bodybuilding is common in the gay community. Some gay websites offer paid for muscle worship sessions with well-known male bodybuilders. Some bodybuilders enjoy the practice and get sexually aroused by it, and therefore engage in it for the sake of the thrill.

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The 2001 documentary film Highway Amazon chronicles the life of female bodybuilder Christine Fetzer and shows several of her clients engaging in muscle worship. More recent documentaries covering the practice include the American Beauty segment of an HBO’s Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel #160, and Channel Five’s 2007 Muscle Worship documentary (part of their Real Lives series), profiling in depth the lives of female bodybuilders Lauren Powers and Gayle Moher.

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Muscle worship engenders a specific type of pornography, often produced professionally, but also web cam sessions, an underground erotic literature, and specific Internet discussion forums like the #gaymuscle IRC channel. A (possibly fictional) account of muscle worship by H. A. Carson combines it with infantilism.

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The entry for wrestling in The Encyclopedia of Unusual Sex Practices lists sthenolagnia (“sexual arousal from displaying strength or muscles”) and cratolagnia (“arousal from strength”) as paraphilias associated with the practice of wrestling for erotic purpose. There appear to be no studies about these proposed concepts; Anil Aggrawal’s 2008 monograph does not go beyond defining the terms, with the same meaning, in a list of over 500 similarly terse definitions encountered in the scientific and lay literature. The British tabloid The Sun listed sthenolagnia second in the Top five freaky fetishes after doraphilia. The Sun describe it as a “condition” where men find “hugely sexually attractive… mega-bronzed muscle-bound ladies in those weird bodybuilding competitions”, and who also “like to be wrestled, lifted up and even carried around by their big iron-pumping dreamgirls”.

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Chus Martinez On Forced Feminisation

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Feminisation (also known as sissification) is used to describe the practice, especially in female dominance, of switching the gender role of a male submissive. It is usually achieved via cross-dressing, where the male is dressed in female attire, ranging from just wearing female undergarments to being fully dressed in very feminine attire and make-up.

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Some males take on tasks, behaviours and roles that are overtly feminine, and adopt female mannerisms and postures in tasks such as sitting, walking and acting in a feminine manner. This emasculation may be coupled with punishments such as spanking or caning to gain cooperation and heighten submission of submissive male. Begging and pleading to stop the feminisation may be part of the fantasy.

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Costumes are sometimes very domestic, suggestive of servitude or age-play. The clothes may be those of a traditional submissive female role, such as schoolgirl, secretary or a “sissy” maid.

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Forced feminisation may also include the male receiving anal sex from a female using a strap-on dildo (sometimes called pegging), or penetration from another male using his penis. Butt plugs and other anal penetrative toys may also be used. Anal sex is used because it may be perceived to be feminine due to its traditional use on women in heterosexual relationships, or due to the passive/receiving/submissive being penetrated, whereas the typical male role may be judged to be more active/dominant. Alternatively, the feminised male may be “forced” to perform oral sex on the penis of another male.

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Another common practice in feminisation is orgasm control, often through the use of a chastity belt.

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Feminisation can also involve the conversion of a masculine name into a feminine name such as “Stephen” into “Stephanie”, “Joseph” into “Josephine”, “Sheldon” into “Shelly” or “Daniel” into “Danielle”. The submissive male may also be given a feminine name that is not similar to his male name, designated as “a good girl”, or insulted with derogatory terms usually applied to women, such as “slut” or “whore”.

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Chus Martinez On Suspension Rope Training For Bondage

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The term suspension training refers to an approach to strength training that uses a system of ropes and webbing called a “suspension trainer” to allow the user to work against their own body weight.

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The capitalized description “Suspension Training” is a registered trade and service mark of Fitness Anywhere Inc. in the United States under USPTO Reg. Nos. 3255160 and 3255161.

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The field of suspension training is a form of resistance training that includes bodyweight exercises in which a variety of multi-planar, compound exercise movements can be performed. These are done with the aim of developing strength, balance, flexibility, and joint stability simultaneously. Bondage enthusiasts are particularly attracted to these fitness exercises because they are perfect training for hardcore sadomasochism involving suspension.

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Rope training has been around as early as the 1800s. Randy Hetrick, a former Navy Seal, developed TRX equipment and the associated Suspension Training bodyweight exercises in the 1990s, and started marketing it in 2005. Kurt Dasbach, a former professional soccer player in Chile, discovered an ancient Andean conditioning system that utilized ropes, while playing in South America and developed a rival product, Inkaflexx, around the same time.

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In 2008, ex-Bristol City F.C. fitness coaching team Mark Hammond and Pete Faulkner developed the FKPro two strap system. Another alternative is the aeroSling ELITE made in Germany. This “suspended pulley trainer” also contains a pulley system.The Hook Isometrics/Suspension Trainer by Sierra Exercise Equipment enables the user to use it for either suspension training or isometrics training. In 2010 Zita Alves, a personal trainer and fitness entrepreneur developed the Ztrainer Suspension Fitness System.

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Proponents of suspension training argue that it develops core body strength, as well as joint and muscular stability, reducing the chance of injury. It is also an excellent preparation for advanced bondage techniques. Some sports scientists have expressed concern that weaker individuals may not have the core stability or joint integrity to use the system safely and effectively. Bondage enthusiasts need not worry about his, to be fit enough for advanced bondage involving suspension they need to be fit enough for suspension training systems. Bondage and advanced sports training go together like birds of a feather!

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