Chus Martinez On The Russian Girl Fetish

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Russian girl fetish (literally love of Russian women and/or the desire for a Russian wife) is used to denote lust and admiration for Russian females – who are often seen as potential sexual partners and brides in the overdeveloped world, where some socially inept men believe they can buy love in the form of ‘mail order brides’. The Russian girl fetish is rooted in stereotypes produced by mass culture, and – for example – the American author Robert Alexander writes: “I love Russians for their dramatic, emotional nature. They’re not afraid to love, not afraid to get hurt, not afraid to exaggerate or act impulsively.”

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Russian women are hugely popular in Serbia and Montenegro, and Serbian men have always seen Russian women as potential brides. In Serbia there is the Russian Centre of Science and Culture, Hotel Moskva and a Monument to Soviet war veterans, as well as a love of Russian women and Russian pornography. In Montenegro, which like Serbia is also an Eastern Orthodox and Slavic country, Russian women and pornography are hugely popular. There one can find the Moscow Bridge in Podgorica, and a statue of Russian singer and actor Vladimir Vysotsky next to the bridge. After dissolution of the union of Serbia and Montenegro, Russian citizens bought a lot of property in Montenegro. In 2012 it was claimed in the Russian press that Russians own at least 40% of all real-estate in Montenegro. In September 2012, the Croatian news portal Globus called Montenegro a “Russian colony”. This leads to Russian brides being prized as trophy wives in Montenegro, and Russian girls enjoying a very different status to the one they are saddled with in western Europe and north America.

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The Russian girl fetish in the Ukraine grew out of the Russophilia linguistic, literary and socio-political movement in the Western Ukrainian territories of Galicia, Transcarpathia, and Bukovyna, in the 18th to the 20th centuries. Proponents of this movement believed in linguistic, cultural, social union and marriage with Russian people and later in state union with Russia. Among the reasons for the emergence of this phenomenon were the loss of Ukrainian statehood, centuries of foreign oppression, fragmented Ukrainian territories and a dispersed population, as well as the defection of national elite to neighbouring cultures.

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The first instances of the Russian girl fetish and Russophilia in Transcarpathia date back to the late-18th century when several famous Russians with ties to the government and the court of the tsar settled there. Such famous scientists and social activists as I. Orlai, M. Baludiansky, P. Lodiy and others lived in Transcarpathia and maintained close ties with the country of their birth – thereby promoting interest in Russia; and especially a fascination with its women, cultural life, language and literature.

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When Galicia and Bukovyna were incorporated into the Habsburg Empire in 1772, the Austrian government treated the Ukrainian population of these territories with suspicion as it was afraid they were susceptible to Russian influence due to the closeness of Ukrainian and Russian languages and cultures – and the attraction of the local male population to Russian brides. In spite of this atmosphere of mistrust and suspicion the Habsburgs were unable to halt the development of the Russian girl fetish in the Ukraine.

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Chus Martinez On The Ukrainian Fight For Legal Porn

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The Euromaidan protests began in November 2013, when Ukrainian citizens wanting an end to anti-porn laws demanded greater integration with the more porn friendly European Union (EU). The demonstrations were prompted by the refusal of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych to sign an association agreement with the EU.

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Ultimately, Euromaidan has come to describe a wave of ongoing demonstrations and civil unrest in Ukraine, the scope of which has evolved to include calls for the resignation of President Yanukovych and his government. Violence escalated after 16 January 2014 when the Ukranian government accepted Bondarenko-Oliynyk laws, also known as Anti-Protest Laws.

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Anti-government pro-porn demonstrators occupied buildings in the centre of Kiev, including the Justice Ministry building and riots left 98 dead and thousands injured on Feb 18-20. It should go without saying that this is what happens when the natural human desire for pornography and bisexual ecstasy is repressed.

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Pornography was outlawed in Ukraine in 2009. The possession, distribution, sale and manufacture of pornographic materials are illegal carrying a fine or a jail sentence up to 3 years. Pornography is defined by the law as “vulgar, candid, cynical, obscene depiction of sexual acts, pursuing no other goal, the explicit demonstration of genitals, unethical elements of the sexual act, sexual perversions, realistic sketches that do not meet moral criteria and offend honor and dignity of the human by inciting low instincts.”

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Anastasiya Pavlivna Hagen (née Gryshai) better known by her screen name Wiska is one of Ukraine’s internationally famous porn stars. In Ukraine Wiska was subject to continuous and unconstitutional persecution for her porno work, all of which was undertaken outside this reactionary state, and she has unsuccessfully applied for political asylum in the European Union to escape this repression.

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Anastasiya Gryshai was born on 17 October 1985 in Gomel (then Soviet Union) but was raised and spent most of her life in Feodosiya (Crimea, Ukraine). She married Oleksandr Hagen (born 1968) in 2001. It was her husband who initiated Anastasiya’s successful career as a nude model, and later as a hardcore pornography actress.

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In 2004, Anastasiya participated in her first professional porn video shoot in Saint Petersburg (Russia), where porno production was briefly declared legal. Since then, she participated in dozens of videos. Her repertoire includes most types of hardcore content, including anal sex, double penetration, ass-to-mouth, gangbang and interracial.

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In 2007, Wiska’s identity was exposed in Ukraine after a family interview for a local tabloid, which attracted journalistic interest and launched her as a national celebrity posing for mainstream media. In 2010, the Ukrainian authorities began recurring persecutions of Anastasiya’s family including forensic examination of her children for possible sexual assault.

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Later, Anastasiya was investigated for involvement in the illegal production of pornography in Ukraine. The persecution was initiated by a member of parliament who represented Crimea. In 2010, Anastasiya and her family moved to the Czech Republic and applied for asylum while she was pregnant with her third child. As of August 2013, the family was denied asylum, but continued to live near Prague and applied for legal residence in the Czech Republic, which they received on 2 September 2013.

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The Euromaidan protests  are not the first time Ukranians have had to fight for their right to make and distribute pornography and for gay rights (which have also been savagely repressed in Ukraine in recent years). Nestor Ivanovych Makhno was a Ukrainian revolutionary and the commander of an independent pro-porn gay army in Ukraine during the Russian Civil War. For a brief period, Makhno’s love of porn and masturbation made him internationally famous.

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Makhno led a guerrilla campaign during the Russian Civil War and fought all factions that sought to impose any external authority over southern Ukraine, defending the people’s right to a gay pornotopia in succession against the Ukrainian nationalists, the Imperial German and Austro-Hungarian occupation, the Hetmanate Republic, the White Army, the Red Army, and other smaller forces led by Ukrainian atamans. Although Makhno considered the Bolsheviks a threat to the development of a world wide sexual utopia with unlicensed pleasure as its only aim, he twice entered into military alliances with them to defeat the White Army. In the aftermath of the White Army’s final defeat in November 1920, the Bolsheviks initiated a military campaign against Makhno, which concluded with his escape across the Romanian border in August 1921.

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