Chus Martinez In Nude For Communism

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Chus Martinez live art documentation “Nude For Communism”. Chus Martinez asked communudist comrades to pose nude for her to create events and series of photographs that rallied people to a praxis of bollock naked revolutionary disalienation.

4 Responses to Nude For Communism

Michael Roth | September 4, 2012 at 3:39 am As a new Communudist, I find having a lap dog essential for awkward social interactions.

chusmartinezproject | September 4, 2012 at 5:07 pm Dogs are generally more reliable than cats who communudists regret putting on their laps if they end up with genital scratches!

Michael Roth | September 5, 2012 at 4:52 am Genital scratches are better than genital warts!

chusmartinezproject | September 5, 2012 at 10:35 am They generally heal quicker and aren’t contagious – but if they are at all deep they are more painful when inflicted!

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Chus Martinez On Streaking!

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Streaking is the act of taking off one’s clothes and running naked through a public place. The word is recorded in its modern sense only since 1973. Before that, to streak in English since 1768 meant “to go quickly, to rush, to run at full speed”, and was a re-spelling of streek: “to go quickly” (c.1380); this in turn was originally a northern Middle English variant of stretch (c. 1250).

The term “streaking” was popularized by a reporter for a local Washington, D.C. news station as he watched a “mass nude run” take place at the University of Maryland in 1973. That nude run had 533 participants. As the collected mass of nude students exited Bel Air dorm, the reporter, whose voice was broadcast live over the station via a pay phone connection exclaimed… “they are streaking past me right now. It’s an incredible sight!” The next day it was out on the Associated Press wire as “streaking” and had nationwide coverage.

Streaking is distinct from naturism or nudism in that streakers usually intend to be noticed and may choose a place with a large audience for their act, regardless of the risk of arrest (sometimes even intending to be remanded into police custody), whereas naturists and nudists generally prefer to be left in peace. It is also distinct from “flashing”, in that the intent is generally not to shock or traumatize a victim. Streakers may streak only once or a few times, possibly as a result of a dare, or may streak so often it can be considered a hobby. The most public form of streaking is running naked before huge crowds at sporting events. However, many streakers seek quieter venues, such as a neighborhood at night after most people have gone to bed.

Anonymously posted fliers proclaiming “Go Naked Week May 1–7″ began appearing on University of Delaware campus bulletin boards in March, 1970. Events included the student newspaper’ The Review’s front-page photograph of a nude couple strolling hand in hand on the Mall, naked pyramid competitions between fraternities, and other, less documented, occurrences. As this was the week of the Kent State shootings, the University was temporarily shut down by its president, Edward Arthur Trabant, under the twin pressures of fully clothed anti-war demonstrators and naked heaps of the apolitical in front of Memorial Hall. Nevertheless, this led to a proposal in the Delaware State Senate to “shut down University funding due to the naked hippies protesting the war.” The bill did not pass.

The high point of streaking’s pop culture significance was in 1974, when thousands of streaks took place around the world. A wide range of novelty products were produced to cash in on the fad, from buttons and patches to a wristwatch featuring a streaking Richard Nixon, to pink underwear that said “Too shy to streak.” The prominence of streaking in 1974 has been linked both to the sexual revolution and a conservative backlash against feminism and the campus protests of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Perhaps the most widely seen streaker in history was 34-year-old Robert Opel, who streaked across the stage flashing the peace sign on national US television at the 46th Academy Awards in 1974. Opel’s run across the stage occurred with host David Niven mostly between him and the camera, so nothing below the waist was visible to the TV audience; a brief blurred view of Opel’s genitalia at the edge of the frame was obscured by the overscan on most contemporary TV sets. Niven quipped, “Isn’t it fascinating to think that probably the only laugh that man will ever get in his life is by stripping off and showing his shortcomings?” It seems that Opel’s appearance was facilitated as a publicity stunt by the show’s producer Jack Haley, Jr. Robert Metzler, the show’s business manager, believed that the incident had been planned in some way; during the dress rehearsal Niven had asked Metzler’s wife to borrow a pen so he could write down the famous line, which was thus not the ad-lib it appeared to be.

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3 Responses to Chus Martinez On Streaking!

Michael Roth | October 7, 2012 at 1:08 am Give yourself 5 minutes of streaking a day and you’ll have a happier, more successful life!

Michael Roth | October 7, 2012 at 1:09 am Streaking is the only spectator sport I watch!

chusmartinezproject | October 7, 2012 at 10:41 pm Streaking is the only sport in which all the participants and all the spectators come out as the winners! It is communudism in action!

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Chus Martinez On Voyeurism

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Voyeurism is the sexual interest in or practice of spying on people engaged in intimate behaviours, such as undressing, sexual activity, or other actions usually considered to be of a private nature.

The principal characteristic of voyeurism is that the voyeur does not normally relate directly with the subject of his/her interest, who is often unaware of being observed. Voyeurism may involve the making of a secret photograph or video of the subject during an intimate activity. When the interest in a particular subject is obsessive, the behaviour may be described as stalking.

However, in today’s society the concept of voyeurism has evolved, especially in popular culture and visual arts. Non-pornographic reality television programs such as Survivor and The Real World, are prime examples of voyeurism, where viewers (the voyeur) are granted an intimate interaction with a subject group or individual. Although not necessarily “voyeurism” in its original definition, as individuals in these given situations are aware of their audience, the concept behind “reality TV” is to allow unscripted social interaction with limited outside interference or influence. As such, the term still maintains its sexual connotations.

All art, and particularly British art from Allen Jones onwards, is voyeuristic. Contemporary London-based artist Jemima Stehli has remade pieces by Jones with herself as the model, these number among the many works in which she appears naked and uses feminism to explore the appeal of voyeurism. The term comes from the French voyeur, “one who looks”, and all art is aimed at those who look!

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Above Chus Martinez gets buck naked for your voyeuristic satisfaction!

2 Responses to Voyeurism

Michael Roth | September 11, 2012 at 3:10 am I turned pro as a voyeur a few years ago and have not looked back since!

chusmartinezproject | September 11, 2012 at 3:56 pm I see that as a real achievement! You’re obviously no pillar of salt!

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Spiritual Communism

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Unlike apologists for capitalist social relations, communudists have no desire to exalt the superiority of ‘modern man’ over his primitive forebears. On the contrary, communudists intuitively understand the ‘grandeur’ of primitive man and see in the society of the future a restoration, albeit on a higher level, of the primitive communism of the classless societies of the past.

Communudists know that anyone who wishes to be consistent in their opposition to capitalism must necessarily re-appropriate the types of consciousness that emerged from primitive communities, as well as their social form. Since the primitive community is a true community, a society without exploitation, in which production is still geared towards the satisfaction of human needs, it follows that a large part of the material resources of these societies were directed not simply towards the immediate struggle for existence but rather into activities that were enjoyed simply for their own sake. Work was suspended and life became play. The remorseless necessity to direct activity towards some future goal was replaced by pursuits without pre-determined ends. The tyranny of time was suspended and instead everybody found themselves transported into an ecstatic present.

The development of civilisation has involved a gradual but accelerating suppression of the shamanic art of ecstasy. Thus the degree to which this art has been lost, crushed, or driven underground by the advance of civilisation, and above all by capitalist civilisation, is a yardstick by which we measure the alienation of (wo)man. Therefore the shaman’s capacity to ‘‘recapture’ the ‘language of the animals’, to allow the unconscious to speak through him, is anything but a regression to a sub-human level. It is rather one aspect of a ‘greater synthesis’ which combines the untrammelled power of animals – who are not subject to repression and can thus function to the maximum of their potential – with the creative intelligence that is unique to the human species. Shamanism is an ascent to a state where (wo)man enjoys a complete and unalienated union of instinct and conscious thought. It is an art of disalienation in which we rediscover our species-being, a state of social ‘grace’ in which we become complete.

Above – Chus Martinez demonstrates the naked power of spiritual communism!

2 Responses to Spiritual Communism

Michael Roth | September 7, 2012 at 4:56 am The wounded Communudist is an archetype for a shamanizing journey. This process is important to the young Communudist. S/he takes on a sickness from the Capitalist system that pushes her or him to the brink of death. This happens for two reasons:

1. The Communudist crosses over to the under world. This happens so he or she can venture to its depths to bring back vital information for the sick infected with the Capitalist disease, and for the good of the community.

2. The Communudist must become sick to understand sickness. When the Communudist overcomes her or his own sickness s/he will hold the cure to heal all that suffer. This is the uncanny mark of the wounded Communudist.

chusmartinezproject | September 7, 2012 at 3:16 pm |Only as transsexual communudist shamans can we collectively climb the world tree and reclaim the ecstasy that is the essence of our species being!


Chus Martinez Splosh Artist!

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Wet and messy fetish (WAM), sometimes known as sploshing, is a form of sexual fetishism whereby a person becomes aroused when substances are deliberately and generously applied to the naked skin, predominantly the face, or to the clothes people are wearing. Several websites are dedicated to WAM fandom.

Messy substances can include whipped cream, mud, shaving foam, custard, baked beans, ketchup, ice cream, pudding, chocolate sauce, peanut butter, Japanese-style lotion, paint, oil or gunge/slime, cake batter etc. A subject will often be pelted with cream pies, slimed or sit on cakes. Wet substances are mainly water but can also include other liquids such as fruit juice, milk or alcohol (usually beer).

Bodily fluids such as feces, urine, vomit, semen, and female ejaculate are not considered part of WAM. The former three are typically considered coprophilia, urophilia, and emetophilia; urophilia is somewhat mainstream in pornography.

Above Chus Martinez and a friend get down and dirty with a slice of live art featuring sploshing and mud wrestling.


Chus Martinez On Naked Austerity

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The debt crisis followed the 2007-2009 financial crisis, erupting first with Greece, then Ireland, Portugal, Italy and Spain, and now even threatens to spread elsewhere. Of those mentioned, only Italy has not received a bailout. Though whether “bailed out” or not, Europe’s people are being forced to undergo “austerity measures,” a political-economic euphemism for cutting social spending, welfare, social services, public sector jobs, and increased taxes. The aim, they are told, is to get their “fiscal house in order.” The people protest, and go out into the streets. The state responds by meeting the people with riot police, batons, tear gas, pepper spray, and rubber bullets. This is called “restoring order.”

The effects of austerity are to increase poverty, unemployment, and misery. People are fired from the public sector, welfare and social benefits are reduced or lost, retirement ages are increased to keep people in the work force and off the pension system, which is also cut. Cuts to health care and education take a social and physical toll; as poverty increases the need for better health care, that very system is dismantled when it is needed most. Taxes are increased, and wages are decreased. People are deeper in debt, and destined for destitution. The objective, we are told, is to reduce public spending so that the government can reduce its deficit (the yearly debt).

In Europe, austerity has been the siren call of all the agencies, organizations, and individuals who represent the interests of elite financial control. In March 2010, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) suggested Europe undertake a program of austerity lasting for no less than six years from 2011 to 2017, which the Financial Times referred to as “highly sensible.” In April of 2010, the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) – the central bank to the world’s central banks – called for European nations to begin implementing austerity measures. In June of 2010, the G20 finance ministers agreed: it was time to enter the age of austerity! German Chancellor Angela Merkel, the European midwife of austerity, set an example for the EU by imposing austerity measures at home in Germany. The G20 leaders met and agreed that the time for stimulus had come to an end, and the time for austerity poverty was at hand.

Above Chus Martinez parodies the austerity drive of the conservative right by demonstrating in naked body suits.


End Sexism In Art!

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Since the sport of female bodybuilding was first organized, gender discrimination has been an issue. People recognize that part of the feminine identity is sculpting their physical appearances and they usually associate the common feminine identity with slenderness and a trim figure. In Studies in Popular Culture A.J. Randall and colleagues describes this as the result of the patriarchal society which emphasizes that femininity is created by altering the body for society’s gendered expectations. When women venture away from the gender expectations, society’s view of their femininity begins to slip. Female bodybuilders experience this criticism of their body, as they build bodies that are commonly associated with the masculine identity. Despite this there is a very dedicated female bodybuilding fan base.

The International Federation of Bodybuilding & Fitness has made several rules changes on the sport of female bodybuilding that relate to expected feminine identity. In the early 1990s the IFBB attempted to “feminize” the sport by making the judges deduct points from competitors who were “too big,” meaning too muscular.  The IFBB then made a rule change in 2000 that emphasized a need for the women to decrease muscularity once again.  Before Ms. International in 2005 the IFBB created another rule that required the women competing to decrease their own muscle mass by 20 percent to compete. Yet the men’s bodybuilding rules have not changed in the same time period. In Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise Chris Shilling and Tanya Bunsell state that all of these rule changes reflect the IFBB’s attempts to make women more closely fit gender expectations, as they all emphasize the need for the female bodybuilders to become less massive. Bunsell and Shilling further state that male bodybuilding hasn’t changed because their bodies are seen as masculine in identity, while female bodybuilding rules inhibit females from reaching the same muscularity.

Something similar to this is also going on in the art world – where male artists are seen as the heavyweights and women aren’t taken nearly as seriously! This must change!

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Above Chus Martinez transformed her body into a hard mass of muscle in a one-year performance piece entitled Gym Rat – which entailed Martinez training daily at a gym.


Chus Martinez On Kitsch!

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Kitsch is an inferior, tasteless copy of an extant style of art or a worthless imitation of art of recognized value. The concept is associated with the deliberate use of elements that may be thought of as cultural icons while making cheap mass-produced objects that are unoriginal. Kitsch also refers to the types of art that are aesthetically deficient (whether or not being sentimental, glamorous, theatrical, or creative) and that make creative gestures which merely imitate the superficial appearances of art through repeated conventions and formulae. Excessive sentimentality often is associated with the term.

The contemporary definition of kitsch is considered derogatory, denoting works executed to pander to popular demand alone and purely for commercial purposes rather than works created as self-expression by an artist. The term is generally reserved for unsubstantial and gaudy works that are calculated to have popular appeal and are considered pretentious and shallow rather than genuine artistic efforts.

The concept of kitsch is applied to artwork that was a response to the 19th century art with aesthetics that convey exaggerated sentimentality and melodrama, hence, kitsch art is closely associated with sentimental art. As a descriptive term, kitsch originated in the art markets of Munich in the 1860s and the 1870s, describing cheap, popular, and marketable pictures and sketches. In Das Buch vom Kitsch (The Book of Kitsch), Hans Reimann defines it as a professional expression “born in a painter’s studio”. Writer Edward Koelwel rejects the suggestion that kitsch derives from the English word sketch, noting how the sketch was not then in vogue, and saying that kitsch art pictures were well-executed, finished paintings rather than sketches.

Kitsch appealed to the crass tastes of the newly moneyed Munich bourgeoisie, who allegedly thought they could achieve the status they envied in the traditional class of cultural elites by aping, however clumsily, the most apparent features of their cultural habits. Kitsch became defined as an aesthetically impoverished object of shoddy production, meant more to identify the consumer with a newly acquired class status than to invoke a genuine aesthetic response. In this sense, the word eventually came to mean “a slapping together” (of a work of art). Kitsch was considered morally dubious and to have sacrificed aesthetic life to a pantomime of aesthetic life, usually, but not always, in the interest of signalling one’s class status.

Immanuel Kant contributed greatly to the philosophical definition of fine art, setting values that could be used to identify kitsch. Bearing in mind Kant describes direct appeal to the senses as “barbaric”, much anti-kitsch criticism is based on his philosophy of aesthetics even when it fails to acknowledge this debt. One, thus, has to keep in mind two things: a) Kant’s enormous influence on the concept of “fine art” as it came into being in the mid to late 18th century, and b) how “sentimentality” or “pathos”, which are the defining traits of kitsch, do not find room within Kant’s “aesthetical indifference”. Kant also identified genius with originality. One could say he implicitly was rejecting kitsch, the presence of sentimentality and the lack of originality being the main accusations against it.

When originality alone is used to determine artistic genius, using it as a single focus may become problematic when the art of some periods is examined. In the Baroque period, for example, a painter was hailed for his ability to imitate other masters. Influenced by Kant’s aesthetics, working with emotional and “unmodern” or “archetypical” motifs was referred to as kitsch from the second half of the 19th century on. Kitsch is thus seen as “false”.

The term kitsch was popularized in the 1930s by the art theorists Theodor Adorno, Hermann Broch, and Clement Greenberg, who each sought to define avant-garde and kitsch as opposites. The art world of the time perceived the immense popularity of kitsch as a threat to culture. The arguments of all three theorists relied on an implicit definition of kitsch as a type of false consciousness, a term meaning a mindset that is misguided as to its own desires and wants.

Adorno perceived this in terms of what he called the “culture industry”, where the art is controlled and formulated by the needs of the market and given to a passive population which accepts it — what is marketed is art that is non-challenging and formally incoherent, but which serves its purpose of giving the audience leisure and something to watch or observe. It helps serve the oppression of the population by distracting them from their social alienation. Contrarily for Adorno, art is supposed to be subjective, challenging, and oriented against the oppressiveness of the power structure. He claimed that kitsch is parody of catharsis and a parody of aesthetic experience.

Broch called kitsch “the evil within the value-system of art”—that is, if true art is “good”, kitsch is “evil”. While art was creative, Broch held that kitsch depended solely on plundering creative art by adopting formulas that seek to imitate it, limiting itself to conventions and demanding a totalitarianism of those recognizable conventions. Broch accuses kitsch of not participating in the development of art, having its focus directed at the past; and Greenberg also speaks of its concern with previous cultures. To Broch, kitsch was not the same as bad art; it formed a system of its own. He argued that kitsch involved trying to achieve “beauty” instead of “truth” and that any attempt to make something beautiful would lead to kitsch.

Greenberg held similar views to Broch concerning the beauty and truth dichotomy, believing that the avant-garde style arose in order to defend aesthetic standards from the decline of taste involved in consumer society and that kitsch and art were opposites, which he outlined in his essay “Avant-Garde and Kitsch” which appeared in the Partisan Review in 1939.

One of Greenberg’s more controversial claims was that kitsch was equivalent to academic art: “All kitsch is academic, and conversely, all that is academic is kitsch.” He argued this based on the fact that academic art, such as that in the nineteenth century, was heavily centred in rules and formulations that were taught and tried to make art into something that could be taught and that was easily expressible. He later came to withdraw from his position of equating the two, as it became heavily criticized.

Often nineteenth century academic art still is seen as kitsch, although this view has come under attack from contemporary art critics. Broch argued that the genesis of kitsch was in Romanticism, which wasn’t kitsch itself, but which opened the door for kitsch taste by emphasizing the need for expressive and evocative art work.

The avant-garde reacted to these developments by separating itself from aspects of art that were widely appreciated, such as pictorial representation and harmony, in order to make a stand for the importance of the aesthetic. Many contemporary critics try not to pigeonhole academic art into the kitsch side of the art-or-kitsch dichotomy, recognizing its historical role in the genesis of both the avant-garde and kitsch.

With the emergence of postmodernism in the 1980s, the borders between kitsch and high art again became blurred. One development was the approval of what is called “camp taste” – which may be related to, but is not the same as camp when used as a “gay sensibility”. Camp, in some circles, refers to an ironic appreciation of that which might otherwise be considered corny, such as singer and dancer Carmen Miranda with her tutti-frutti hats, or otherwise kitsch, such as popular culture events that are particularly dated or inappropriately serious, such as the low-budget science fiction movies of the 1950s and 1960s.

A hypothetical example from the world of painting would be a kitsch image of a deer by a lake. In order to make this camp, one could paint a sign beside it, saying “No Swimming”. The majestic or romantic impression of a stately animal would be punctured by humor; the notion of an animal receiving a punishment for the breach of the rule is patently ludicrous. The original, serious sentimentality of the motif is neutralized, and thus, it becomes camp.

Susan Sontag argued in her 1964 Notes on “Camp” that camp was an attraction to the human qualities which expressed themselves in “failed attempts at seriousness”, the qualities of having a particular and unique style. It involved an aesthetic of artifice rather than of nature. Indeed, hard-line supporters of camp culture have long insisted that “camp is a lie that dares to tell the truth”

Much of pop art attempted to incorporate images from popular culture and kitsch. These artists strove to maintain legitimacy by saying they were “quoting” imagery to make conceptual points, usually with the appropriation being ironic. Despite the difficulties in defining the boundaries between kitsch and fine art since the beginning of postmodernism, the word “kitsch” still remains in common use to label anything seen as being in poor taste.

2 Comments

Michael Roth On October 7, 2012 at 3:02 am: In a survey of acrotomophiles, abstract acrylic paintings of leg amputations were preferred over pen and ink drawings of arm amputations; installation works of amputations of a single limb, over concept pieces of double amputations; and land art installations of amputations that left a stump, over multimedia works of amputations that left no stump.

chusmartinezproject On October 7, 2012 at 10:18 pm: Amputees rock!


Chus Martinez On Dendrophilia & Being A Tree Sex Girl Again!

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Dendrophilia (or less often arborphilia or dendrophily) literally means “love of trees”. The term may sometimes refer to a paraphilia in which people are sexually attracted to or sexually aroused by trees. This may involve sexual contact or veneration as phallic symbols or both.

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I’m Chus Martinez and I’m a realistic romantic idealist into tree sex. I like tree frugging. But also music, singing, handball, friends… I’m many sided. I’m happy most of the time, how could I not be as I’m a pretty lucky girl that needs to be grateful for so many things…i don’t believe in coincidence, things really do happen for a reason…one just has to have faith that everything will turn out for the best. I know that tree sex can save the planet. Here are photos of me doing it!

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Above Chus Martinez has sex with a tree!

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Above Chus Martinez has sex with a tree!

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Above Chus Martinez has sex with a tree!

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Above Chus Martinez has sex with a tree!

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Above Chus Martinez has sex with a tree!

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Above Chus Martinez has sex with a tree!

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Above Chus Martinez has sex with a tree!

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Above Chus Martinez has sex with a tree!

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Above Chus Martinez has sex with a tree!

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Above Chus Martinez has sex with a tree!

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6 Responses to More Tree Sex Action With Chus Martinez

Ankur Sharma | September 23, 2012 at 6:17 am Hahahahahaha 😀 You’re funny!

chusmartinezproject | September 23, 2012 at 1:16 pm I try to be – glad this made you laugh!

clumie | September 23, 2012 at 2:51 pm Chuz is out of her tree!

chusmartinezproject | September 23, 2012 at 5:28 pm Madness is the only sane response to an insane capitalist world!

Michael Roth | October 7, 2012 at 2:52 am Tree sex is the only sane response to an insane capitalist world!

chusmartinezproject | October 7, 2012 at 10:17 pm Once you’ve had a tree you’ll never want anything else again!


Chus Martinez & The Polymorphous Perverts

More super-dumb two chord thud from Chus Martinez. Storm The Yuppie Homes – old school punk rock bleeding into hardcore…..